Playing Fair: Teaching Situated Ethics Through Inventing Games Products

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    Book

    Games, in the right environment and with the right guidance from teachers, offer students opportunities to grow as independent problem solvers, decision makers, and team players. In addition, students can learn a host of other skills, strategies, and concepts that can transfer not only to other games but also to other life situations.

    Playing Fair shows teachers how to create the learning environments typical of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) approach. This text takes the TGfU approach to a new level, incorporating the development of group processes and democratic behaviors that promote personal growth as well as the ability to thrive in group situations.

    Antisocial behavior and bullying are ongoing problems in schools today. The concepts and practical ideas for lessons offered in Playing Fair address those problems proactively as students learn about conflict resolution, inclusion, democratic decision making, leadership, and bullying. The topics in this book come together in developing the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains, all primary goals of the physical education curriculum.

    A Peek Inside Playing Fair
    Playing Fair offers teachers these benefits:
    • Practical classroom stories showing teachers how they can apply theory and learning situations to their own students and school context
    • Activities that include modifications so teachers can apply the games with students of all developmental levels
    • Learning checks consisting of questions for teachers to ask their students in order to assess their learning
    • Key Concepts, a special element that calls out important concepts for readers
    The first part of the book covers the process of inventing games and the democratic principles involved, how social justice can be taught and learned through games, understanding the TGfU classification system, curriculum design, and pedagogical principles. The remaining 10 chapters show how to implement the concepts presented in the earlier chapters. Readers learn how to invent and play a variety of games: target games, striking games, net/wall games, and invasion games.

    What Your Students Will Gain
    Implementing the principles advocated in this book will help learners in these ways:
    • Better understand and appreciate the constructs of game play through external and internalized schemas
    • Transfer concepts, strategies, tactics, and skills within and among game categories
    • Improve their performance and become more engaged in their own learning
    • Become more self-effective and empowered as they understand and value the processes of decision making
    • Understand how democracy works from the bottom up
    • Grasp that democracy is tenuous, that it breaks down in the absence of active social justice, and that we all have a role and responsibility in constructing and reconstructing it, moment by moment
    Playing Fair will help students gain a better understanding of themselves and others, and it will make them sensitive to issues such as social justice, collaboration, negotiation, inclusiveness, and fairness. Students will learn to make informed decisions in the context of their invented games and to make intentional, reasoned inquiries about game situations, which they can then transfer to other areas of their lives.

    Bringing Systemic Change and Facilitating Personal Growth
    This book will help teachers and coaches teach the principles of game play and those of democracy and citizenship in concrete ways. They will contribute to systemic change in the school culture—a culture in which students learn to create their own games and gamelike situations wherein concepts, skills, and strategies can be learned in context through a process called democracy in action.

    The bottom line is simple. Playing Fair brings out inherent qualities that have been part of games since the beginning of humankind: play, fun, challenge, inventiveness, teamwork, friendship, and quick thinking. Along the way, games offer opportunities for moral and spiritual development—and the games in Playing Fair offer all that and more.

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 1 Play, Inventing Games, Democracy in Action, and Worldview

    Reintegration of Play in Games

    Process of Inventing Games

    Democracy in Action (DiA)

    Worldview of an Inventing Games Teacher: Ecological Complexity Thinking

    Summary

    Chapter 2 Teaching and Learning Social Justice Through Inventing Games

    Revisiting the True Meaning of Competition

    Teaching Social Justice and Democracy in Action

    Summary

    Chapter 3 Scaffolds for Learning: Schema, Transfer, Classifications, and Rules

    TGfU Classification and Inventing Games

    Understanding Game Constructs Through Inventing Rules

    Structuring the Inventing Games Curriculum

    Teaching for Transfer

    Curriculum Organization

    Summary

    Chapter 4 Developmental Learning and Curriculum Design

    Psychomotor Domain (Moving)

    Cognitive Domain (Thinking)

    Affective Domain (Feeling)

    Conclusions

    Summary

    Chapter 5 Pedagogical Principles

    Joy Butler and Linda L. Griffin

    Teaching as Facilitating

    Tactical Complexity

    Modifications Through Representation, Exaggeration, and Adaptation

    Assessment of Learning Outcomes

    Summary

    Chapter 6 Inventing Unopposed Target Games

    Stage 1: Setting the Learning Environment and Setting Conditions for Democracy in Action by Developing a Decision-Making Agreement

    Stage 2: Developing Target Game Constructs by Observing a Partner

    Stage 3: Inventing and Playing a New Target Game

    Stage 4: Refining the Invented Game

    Stage 5: Refining the Skills Required in the Invented Game

    Stage 6: Challenging Everyone by Adapting Rules

    Stage 7: Showcasing the Game

    Summary

    Chapter 7 Innovative Approaches to Opposed Target Games

    James Mandigo

    Lesson 1: Accuracy to Target

    Lesson 2: Avoiding Obstacles

    Lesson 3: Using Obstacles to Get Closer to a Target

    Lesson 4: Preventing Scoring (Offense)

    Lesson 5: Preventing Scoring (Offense)

    Lesson 6: Preventing Scoring (Defense)

    Summary

    Chapter 8 Inventing Striking Games: Danish Longball

    How to Play DLB: Regulations and Rules

    Guide for Teaching Stages

    Stage 1: Setting the Learning Environment for Democracy in Action and Fair Game Play

    Stage 2: Changeover Rule (Transitions)

    Stage 3: Refining Rules and Establishing the Role of the Referee

    Stage 4: Strategic Offense Concept 1 and Coach and Observer Roles

    Stage 5: Strategic Offense Concept 2

    Stage 6: Strategic Defense Concept 1

    Stage 7: Strategic Defense Concept 2

    Stage 8: Showcasing All Games and Standardizing One Through the Democratic Process

    Stage 9: Playful DLB Competition Tournament

    Summary

    Chapter 9 Striking Game: Cricket

    Kevin Sandher

    Unit Plan Structure

    Assessment

    Lesson 1: Learning Basic Rules

    Lesson 2: Offense Concept: Hitting to Open Space

    Lesson 3: Defense Concept: Reducing Batter Time Using Throwing

    Lesson 4: Running Between Wickets and Catching to Get Batters Out

    Lesson 5: Combination Skills

    Lesson 6: Defense Concept—Bowling to Limit the Batter’s Time

    Lesson 7: Using the GPAI for Assessment

    Lesson 8: Pairs Cricket Tournament

    Summary

    Chapter 10 Inventing Net and Wall Games

    Joy Butler and Tim Hopper

    Framework (Strategic Concepts and Tactical Decisions)

    Stages of Invention and Democracy in Action

    Stage 1: Setting the Learning Environment for (A) Democracy in Action and (B) Game Constructs—Defining Net and Wall Games

    Stage 2: Spatial Awareness in Net Games—Castle Game

    Stage 3: Spatial Awareness in Wall Games

    Stage 4: Creating Net and Wall Games Through the Democratic Process

    Stage 5: Challenging Everyone Through Adaptation

    Stage 6: Refining Games and Establishing the Role of the Coach

    Stage 7: Showcasing Games and Revising

    Stage 8: Competitive Game

    Summary

    Chapter 11 Net and Wall Games: Pickleball

    Tim Hopper

    Game Understanding

    Tactical Framework for Strategic Principles

    Lessons and Learning Experiences

    Court Areas and Learning to Play Pickleball

    Area 1: Short-Court Games

    Area 2: Long-Court Games

    Area 3: Volley-Court Games

    Doubles Dink Tennis

    Three for a Win

    Summary

    Chapter 12 Inventing Invasion Games

    Stage 1A: Setting the Learning Environment for Invasion Game Constructs and Democracy in Action

    Stage 1B: Defining Invasion Game Constructs

    Stage 2: Establishing the Game Through the Democratic Process

    Stage 3: Playing the Game

    Stage 4: Refining the Game

    Stage 5: Identifying the Coach

    Stage 6: Identifying the Referee

    Stage 7: Showcasing Games

    Stage 8: Defense

    Stage 9: Offense

    Stage 10: Transferring Concepts From Inventing Games to Institutionalized Games

    Summary

    Chapter 13 Invasion Game: Soccer

    Steve Mitchell

    Lesson 1: Primary and Secondary Rules

    Lesson 2: Keeping Possession

    Lesson 3: Distribution of Possession

    Lesson 4: Penetration and Scoring

    Lesson 5: Preventing Scoring

    Lesson 6: Denying Space

    Lesson 7: Obtaining Possession

    Lesson 8: Regaining Possession

    Summary

    Chapter 14 Invasion Game: Touch Football

    Bobby Gibson

    Pedagogy

    Democracy in Action

    Unit Plan Structure

    Lesson 1: Ultimate Football

    Lesson 2: Flickerball

    Lesson 3: Flickerball Extended

    Lesson 4: Offensive and Defensive Team Concepts

    Lesson 5: Gamelike Situations

    Lesson 6: Kicking

    Lesson 7: Team Formation and Playbook Design

    Lesson 8: Game Play and Game Management

    Summary

    Chapter 15 Final Thoughts

    Audience

    Resource for in-service physical education teachers. Reference for pre-service teachers and graduate students.

    About the

    Joy Butler, EdD, is a professor in the department of curriculum and pedagogy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. She is coordinator of physical education teacher education (PETE), outdoor education, and health programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Born in the United Kingdom, Butler taught secondary school physical education there for 10 years and coached three basketball teams to national finals.

    Butler is active in international scholarship, organization, and advocacy for TGfU (Teaching Games for Understanding). She founded and chaired the TGfU Task Force in 2002 and aided its evolution into the TGfU SIG in 2006. She directed the 1st and 4th International TGfU conferences in 2001 and 2008. Butler has been invited to give presentations and workshops on TGfU in Finland, Singapore, Australia, Spain, Taiwan, Hong Kong, the UK, Colombia, and Germany. In 2012 she created and has since chaired the TGfU International Advisory Board, composed of 19 individual country representatives.

    Butler has edited or coedited seven TGfU books.

    eBook

    Games, in the right environment and with the right guidance from teachers, offer students opportunities to grow as independent problem solvers, decision makers, and team players. In addition, students can learn a host of other skills, strategies, and concepts that can transfer not only to other games but also to other life situations.

    Playing Fair shows teachers how to create the learning environments typical of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) approach. This text takes the TGfU approach to a new level, incorporating the development of group processes and democratic behaviors that promote personal growth as well as the ability to thrive in group situations.

    Antisocial behavior and bullying are ongoing problems in schools today. The concepts and practical ideas for lessons offered in Playing Fair address those problems proactively as students learn about conflict resolution, inclusion, democratic decision making, leadership, and bullying. The topics in this book come together in developing the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains, all primary goals of the physical education curriculum.

    A Peek Inside Playing Fair
    Playing Fair offers teachers these benefits:
    • Practical classroom stories showing teachers how they can apply theory and learning situations to their own students and school context
    • Activities that include modifications so teachers can apply the games with students of all developmental levels
    • Learning checks consisting of questions for teachers to ask their students in order to assess their learning
    • Key Concepts, a special element that calls out important concepts for readers
    The first part of the book covers the process of inventing games and the democratic principles involved, how social justice can be taught and learned through games, understanding the TGfU classification system, curriculum design, and pedagogical principles. The remaining 10 chapters show how to implement the concepts presented in the earlier chapters. Readers learn how to invent and play a variety of games: target games, striking games, net/wall games, and invasion games.

    What Your Students Will Gain
    Implementing the principles advocated in this book will help learners in these ways:
    • Better understand and appreciate the constructs of game play through external and internalized schemas
    • Transfer concepts, strategies, tactics, and skills within and among game categories
    • Improve their performance and become more engaged in their own learning
    • Become more self-effective and empowered as they understand and value the processes of decision making
    • Understand how democracy works from the bottom up
    • Grasp that democracy is tenuous, that it breaks down in the absence of active social justice, and that we all have a role and responsibility in constructing and reconstructing it, moment by moment
    Playing Fair will help students gain a better understanding of themselves and others, and it will make them sensitive to issues such as social justice, collaboration, negotiation, inclusiveness, and fairness. Students will learn to make informed decisions in the context of their invented games and to make intentional, reasoned inquiries about game situations, which they can then transfer to other areas of their lives.

    Bringing Systemic Change and Facilitating Personal Growth
    This book will help teachers and coaches teach the principles of game play and those of democracy and citizenship in concrete ways. They will contribute to systemic change in the school culture—a culture in which students learn to create their own games and gamelike situations wherein concepts, skills, and strategies can be learned in context through a process called democracy in action.

    The bottom line is simple. Playing Fair brings out inherent qualities that have been part of games since the beginning of humankind: play, fun, challenge, inventiveness, teamwork, friendship, and quick thinking. Along the way, games offer opportunities for moral and spiritual development—and the games in Playing Fair offer all that and more.

    Table of Contents

    Foreword
    Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    Chapter 1 Play, Inventing Games, Democracy in Action, and Worldview
    Reintegration of Play in Games
    Process of Inventing Games
    Democracy in Action (DiA)
    Worldview of an Inventing Games Teacher: Ecological Complexity Thinking
    Summary
    Chapter 2 Teaching and Learning Social Justice Through Inventing Games
    Revisiting the True Meaning of Competition
    Teaching Social Justice and Democracy in Action
    Summary
    Chapter 3 Scaffolds for Learning: Schema, Transfer, Classifications, and Rules
    TGfU Classification and Inventing Games
    Understanding Game Constructs Through Inventing Rules
    Structuring the Inventing Games Curriculum
    Teaching for Transfer
    Curriculum Organization
    Summary
    Chapter 4 Developmental Learning and Curriculum Design
    Psychomotor Domain (Moving)
    Cognitive Domain (Thinking)
    Affective Domain (Feeling)
    Conclusions
    Summary
    Chapter 5 Pedagogical Principles
    Joy Butler and Linda L. Griffin
    Teaching as Facilitating
    Tactical Complexity
    Modifications Through Representation, Exaggeration, and Adaptation
    Assessment of Learning Outcomes
    Summary
    Chapter 6 Inventing Unopposed Target Games
    Stage 1: Setting the Learning Environment and Setting Conditions for Democracy in Action by Developing a Decision-Making Agreement
    Stage 2: Developing Target Game Constructs by Observing a Partner
    Stage 3: Inventing and Playing a New Target Game
    Stage 4: Refining the Invented Game
    Stage 5: Refining the Skills Required in the Invented Game
    Stage 6: Challenging Everyone by Adapting Rules
    Stage 7: Showcasing the Game
    Summary
    Chapter 7 Innovative Approaches to Opposed Target Games
    James Mandigo
    Lesson 1: Accuracy to Target
    Lesson 2: Avoiding Obstacles
    Lesson 3: Using Obstacles to Get Closer to a Target
    Lesson 4: Preventing Scoring (Offense)
    Lesson 5: Preventing Scoring (Offense)
    Lesson 6: Preventing Scoring (Defense)
    Summary
    Chapter 8 Inventing Striking Games: Danish Longball
    How to Play DLB: Regulations and Rules
    Guide for Teaching Stages
    Stage 1: Setting the Learning Environment for Democracy in Action and Fair Game Play
    Stage 2: Changeover Rule (Transitions)
    Stage 3: Refining Rules and Establishing the Role of the Referee
    Stage 4: Strategic Offense Concept 1 and Coach and Observer Roles
    Stage 5: Strategic Offense Concept 2
    Stage 6: Strategic Defense Concept 1
    Stage 7: Strategic Defense Concept 2
    Stage 8: Showcasing All Games and Standardizing One Through the Democratic Process
    Stage 9: Playful DLB Competition Tournament
    Summary
    Chapter 9 Striking Game: Cricket
    Kevin Sandher
    Unit Plan Structure
    Assessment
    Lesson 1: Learning Basic Rules
    Lesson 2: Offense Concept: Hitting to Open Space
    Lesson 3: Defense Concept: Reducing Batter Time Using Throwing
    Lesson 4: Running Between Wickets and Catching to Get Batters Out
    Lesson 5: Combination Skills
    Lesson 6: Defense Concept—Bowling to Limit the Batter’s Time
    Lesson 7: Using the GPAI for Assessment
    Lesson 8: Pairs Cricket Tournament
    Summary
    Chapter 10 Inventing Net and Wall Games
    Joy Butler and Tim Hopper
    Framework (Strategic Concepts and Tactical Decisions)
    Stages of Invention and Democracy in Action
    Stage 1: Setting the Learning Environment for (A) Democracy in Action and (B) Game Constructs—Defining Net and Wall Games
    Stage 2: Spatial Awareness in Net Games—Castle Game
    Stage 3: Spatial Awareness in Wall Games
    Stage 4: Creating Net and Wall Games Through the Democratic Process
    Stage 5: Challenging Everyone Through Adaptation
    Stage 6: Refining Games and Establishing the Role of the Coach
    Stage 7: Showcasing Games and Revising
    Stage 8: Competitive Game
    Summary
    Chapter 11 Net and Wall Games: Pickleball
    Tim Hopper
    Game Understanding
    Tactical Framework for Strategic Principles
    Lessons and Learning Experiences
    Court Areas and Learning to Play Pickleball
    Area 1: Short-Court Games
    Area 2: Long-Court Games
    Area 3: Volley-Court Games
    Doubles Dink Tennis
    Three for a Win
    Summary
    Chapter 12 Inventing Invasion Games
    Stage 1A: Setting the Learning Environment for Invasion Game Constructs and Democracy in Action
    Stage 1B: Defining Invasion Game Constructs
    Stage 2: Establishing the Game Through the Democratic Process
    Stage 3: Playing the Game
    Stage 4: Refining the Game
    Stage 5: Identifying the Coach
    Stage 6: Identifying the Referee
    Stage 7: Showcasing Games
    Stage 8: Defense
    Stage 9: Offense
    Stage 10: Transferring Concepts From Inventing Games to Institutionalized Games
    Summary
    Chapter 13 Invasion Game: Soccer
    Steve Mitchell
    Lesson 1: Primary and Secondary Rules
    Lesson 2: Keeping Possession
    Lesson 3: Distribution of Possession
    Lesson 4: Penetration and Scoring
    Lesson 5: Preventing Scoring
    Lesson 6: Denying Space
    Lesson 7: Obtaining Possession
    Lesson 8: Regaining Possession
    Summary
    Chapter 14 Invasion Game: Touch Football
    Bobby Gibson
    Pedagogy
    Democracy in Action
    Unit Plan Structure
    Lesson 1: Ultimate Football
    Lesson 2: Flickerball
    Lesson 3: Flickerball Extended
    Lesson 4: Offensive and Defensive Team Concepts
    Lesson 5: Gamelike Situations
    Lesson 6: Kicking
    Lesson 7: Team Formation and Playbook Design
    Lesson 8: Game Play and Game Management
    Summary
    Chapter 15 Final Thoughts
    References
    About the Contributors
    About the Author

    Audience

    Resource for in-service physical education teachers. Reference for pre-service teachers and graduate students.

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